09.09.2017

New Talent Grand PIX nominees are…….

Each year CPH PIX screen the most significant, surprising and entertaining films from first-time feature film makers in the festival’s main competition ‘New Talent Grand PIX’ – and this year is no exception! 11 promising debuting directors are this year competing for the award and a 6,000 euro cash prize.

Focusing on upcoming filmmakers, only debut features compete in the main award ‘New Talent Grand PIX’. These are the talents we are looking forward to see much more from and the talents we want to help along with their next project. The filmmakers, seven women and four men, competing for the talent award this year are:

Hlynur Pálmason (IS), ‘Winter Brothers’

‘Winter Brothers’ is filled with strange images, right down to its title. With his Danish feature film debut, the Icelandic director Pálmason has made a film that is beyond time and space. It takes place in a lime quarry, which is completely shielded from the outside world, where the dust turns everything grey and where night and day seem to melt together. Both for us and for the brothers Emil (Elliot Crosset Hove) and Johan (Simon Sears), who live and work together in this dusty hell. ‘Winter Brothers’ rises above the elements. Neither warm nor cold, neither good nor evil. But with a quivering presence, which is wild and hard to shake off. Danish cinema has been pining for a film like this one.

‘Winter Brothers’ is screening on the following days:

Thursday 5th of October at 21:30 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.
Sunday 8th of October at 15:00 in Empire Bio. Get tickets.
Tuesday 10th of October at 19:15 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Carla Simón (ES), ‘Summer 1993’

‘Summer 1993’ won the Best First Feature Award at the Berlin Film Festival earlier this year, and has since caused a stir at several other festivals with its subdued and razor-sharp depiction of a 6-year-old girl’s struggle with life. Frida first lost her father, and now also her mother, and therefore she moves from Barcelona to an uncle and aunt in the countryside. Their empathy is almost endless, but little Frida is paralysed by grief and pain. An unuttered cry for help and contact, which has a destructive expression, not only wears them all down, but maybe also threatens the couple’s own 3-year-old daughter. Carla Simón directs the drama with tender precision and takes a movingly unsentimental approach to a reshaped family, which tries to get through to the young girl’s heart. The result is an intimate, thoughtful and ultimately warm film, which will not leave any parent untouched.

‘Summer 1993’ is screening on the following days:

Tuesday 3rd of October at 19:00 in Dagmar Theatre. Get tickets.
Tuesday 10th of October at 19:00 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Janicza Bravo (US), ‘Lemon’

‘Lemon’ is a bizarre comedy, full of cringe-worthy and embarrassing moments. It has a provocatively unlikeable protagonist in the 40-year-old over-neurotic, slightly perverted and thoroughly useless theatre director Isaac, who is so enamoured with himself that his blind girlfriend can’t stand it any more. She leaves him, but we are left hanging, until we against all expectations actually start liking the man. The story is a swipe at complacent white men, directed by a black woman, Janicza Bravo. She has written the screenplay together with her husband, the comedian Brett Gelman, who plays Isaac, and together they get to shake up all kinds of prejudices and stereotypes. In a film that gets funnier and funnier – and is full of originality, right down to its physical humour, its hard editing and surprising use of music.

‘Lemon’ is screening on the following days:

Wednesday 4th October at 17:30 in Empire Bio. Get tickets.
Friday 6th October at 16:40 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.
Monday 9th October at 21:15 in Gloria Biograf. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Léonor Serraille (FR), ‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’

There is something recognisable about her. A woman, 30+, Parisian and, for good measure, on the verge of a nervous breakdown. To be more precise: Julia (Laetitia Dosch) has already crossed the verge. Her boyfriend of 10 years has just left her, and we meet her shattered, but with an unshakeable faith that there is a way out of her misery. Julia is wild and totally loveable in her attempts to renew herself after the long, stable relationship – and the next moment she is too much. She is direct and honest, and pushes everyone away from her as she strives to hold onto her girlfriends, her men and her jobs, which all disappear as fast as they come. An intense and moving character portrait by the director Léonor Serraille, which takes us inside the woman’s head – and which won this year’s Camera d’Or in Cannes for the best debut feature.

‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’ is screening on the following days: 

Wednesday 4th October at 20:00 in Empire Bio. Get tickets.
Saturday 7th October at 16:40 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.

Xavier Legrand (FR), ‘Custody’

After their divorce, Myriam and Antoine get shared custody of their son. This is completely against the wishes of 13-year-old Julien, who suddenly becomes the hostage of a jealous and violent father, and the shield for a terrorised mother. Pushed beyond the limits of what a child should have to endure, in an attempt to prevent the worst. Many fine films have been made about children in broken marriages, but none like ‘Custody’, which goes straight to the terror of everyday life and depicts anxiety and aggression with a tension and courage that is more reminiscent of Roman Polanski’s ‘Repulsion’ than ‘Kramer vs Kramer’. The film is masterfully directed by the debut director Xavier Legrand, who knows exactly what he wants in every single scene. And the performances are brutally honest, especially that of the young Thomas Gioria, who carries the demanding role of Julien with heartbreaking naturalism.

‘Custody’ is screening on the following days: 

Tuesday 3rd October at 21:30 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.
Friday 6th October at 21:15 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Tuesday 10th October at 21:30 in Dagmar Theatre. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Rungano Nyoni (UK/ZM), ‘I Am Not A Witch’

The 9-year-old orphan Shula is given the blame for small and even microscopic accidents in her small Zambian village. She is vilified as a witch and banished to a travelling, government-run witch camp, which is both a freak show for tourists and an oracle for local officials. This is the starting point of Rugnano Nyoni’s fascinating debut about superstition and gender stereotypes, which are still thriving on the African continent. But being a witch is not all bad, just like nothing is black and white in Zambia – or in Nyoni’s film, which is as eccentric as it is realistic, full of black humour, poetry and a pinch of magic. A warm and wonderful film, where the witches are tied to poles with long strings to make sure they don’t fly away, and it is all captured in magnificent images by David Gallego, who was also behind ‘Embrace of the Serpent’.

‘I Am Not A Witch’ is screening on the following days: 

Thursday  5th October at 19:00 in Dagmar Theatre. Get tickets.
Sunday 8th October at 16:30 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Wednesday 11th October at 16:40 in Grand Theatre. Get tickets.

Cecilia Atán og Valeria Pivato (AR), ‘The Desert Bride’

It’s not what happens in the film that makes Cecilia Atán and Valeria Pivato’s debut so special. It is the warm desert wind that wraps itself around the characters. The glow, that is gradually lit in 54-year-old Teresa’s eyes, and spreads across the cinema auditorium. And the quiet elegance in the autumn-coloured images, which cover the plot like ones favourite blanket and give ‘The Desert Bride’ a perfect balance between form and content. All her life, Teresa has been a domestic helper in Buenos Aires. Now, she is on her own for the first time, on a late grand tour through the Argentinian pampas, where she crosses paths and shares fleeting dreams with the travelling salesman Gringo. More is not needed. ‘The Desert Bride’ is a charming late-summer romance, borne by the beautiful Chilean actress Pauline Garcia from ‘Gloria’ in the eponymous role.

‘The Desert Bride’ is screening on the following days: 

Sunday 1st October at 19:30 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Friday 6th October at 16:30 in Dagmar Theatre. Get tickets.
Monday 9th October at 19:00 in Gloria Biograf. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Alireza Khatami (IR), ‘Oblivion Verses’

The calm old caretaker at a mortuary in Santiago – which is threatened by closure – can remember everything except names. He prefers to stick to himself and his plants, but when the military storms the mortuary after a demonstration to hide civilian victims, he is suddenly left with the body of a young woman. Nobody wants to have anything to do with her, but the old man decides to give her a proper funeral, whatever the cost may be. The director Alireza Khatami is Iranian, but ‘Oblivion Verses’ is every inch a Latin American film. It is an understated comedy, full of kindness and magic realism. But it is also – in a country marked by political crimes – a meditation on the memory of the dead, and a poetic tribute to all those who struggle to show their respect to strangers and the unknown.

‘Oblivion Verses’ is screening on the following days: 

Thursday 5th October at 16:30 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Sunday 8th October at 15:00 in Gloria Biograf. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Pedro Pinho (PT), ‘The Nothing Factory’

When the management tries to close a factory in the dead of night, the workers rebel. While the directors flee from the unpaid bills, the workers do nothing less than take over the running of the factory. ‘And now what?’ Pedro Pinho asks in his three hour long ‘The Nothing Factory’. For here, where all other films might end, the director avoids all fake working-class romance and asks what the political left actually wants? The order books are not automatically filled just because the workers stand together. And the economic crisis is not reversed by turning ones back on capitalism. The result is both the most important political film in years, and a poetic and humanistic depiction of the human being behind the machines. Halfway between reality and fiction, full of philosophical discussions, musicals and adventures. A demanding but also rewarding film.

‘The Nothing Factory’ is screening on the following days: 

Saturday 30th September at 13:30 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Friday 6th October at 12:30 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

Ivana Mladenovic (RS), ‘Soldiers. Story from Ferentari’

Time for petting. The student Adi is doing field work in Bucharest’s gypsy ghetto, where he is studying the Roma’s Manele music. He has turned 40, but has not yet finished his dissertation, and he is also spending most of his time at the bar, where men who are as wide as they are tall are forcing him to buy rounds. The worst of them is Alberto, who has spent half his life behind bars; but behind the bragging brute is a benign teddy bear, and the two men begin an intimate relationship in a liberatingly clumsy way. Ivana Mladenovic is herself doing field work with her first film, which was shot on location in the notorious Ferentari ghetto. A closed male world, which she with her handheld camera and curious gaze manages to depict with surprising tenderness. The result has in every way become a wild and challenging love story.

‘Soldiers. Story from Ferentari’ is screening on the following days: 

Wednesday 4th October at 14:15 in Cinemateket. Get tickets.
Thursday 5th October at 21:15 in Gloria Biograf. Get tickets.
Tuesday 10th October at 17:30 in Empire Bio. Get tickets.

Watch the trailer.

The full festival lineup is announced on September 12th with the Danish premiere of Sofia Coppolas ‘The Beguiled’ in Dagmar Theatre.